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thepeoplesrecord:

7 black women to follow for updates in #Ferguson
August 18, 2014

Like much of the world, I haven’t been able to take my eyes off of the unrest that’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Social media has, once again, proven it’s effectiveness in quickly disseminating information and fact-checking mainstream sources for an event that the history books will not forgot. While you’re trying to keep up with what’s going on, be sure to follow these women who are doing extraordinary work telling stories and keeping those of us who cannot make it to Ferguson abreast of what’s happening on the ground.

1)      Brittany Noble | Reporter for KMOV in St. Louis | Twitter/Instagram

2)      Yamiche Alcindor | Contributor for MSNBC and USA Today | Twitter/Vine/Website

3)      Maria Chappelle-Nadal | Missouri State Senator | Twitter

4)      Patricia Bynes | Democratic committeewoman of Ferguson Township | Twitter

5)      Tasha B. | Resident & activist | Twitter/Instagram

6)      @Awkward_Duck | Resident & activist | Twitter

7)      Johnetta E. | Resident & activist | Twitter

Source

(via compelledinfidel)

mdthwomp:

Unfriendly reminder that in America it’s reasonable to say an unarmed black kid deserved to be shot six times because he might have robbed a convenience store, but a white kid shouldn’t be kicked off the high school football team just because he violently raped a girl.

(via misandry-mermaid)

Read this weeks Batwoman

lisaquestions:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

Marc Abdreyko Is GARBAGE

This week’s issue of Batwoman is stupid, horribly written lesbophobic trash written by a bigoted sack of shit who should never have been allowed to write this book or write for any queer woman for that matter

It is…

youngphilo:

liz-pls:

I’m only sharing tweets for those who are not on twitter and can’t see how passionate and outraged journalists are as they tweet from #Ferguson.

If you are on Twitter, here’s a good roster of people to follow if you want to keep updated.

Just now reading about this Luis Gonzalez case  

(via compelledinfidel)

misandry-mermaid:

fabulazerstokill:

sassy-gay-justice:

I’m terrible.


I would get bingo so fast if I brought Ferguson up on my FB feed

They left off the one that I’ve been seeing the most, which is the ridiculous justifications for why he was targeted:  smoking pot, robbing a store, trying to grab the officer’s gun, etc.  All these things that were made up or speculated about on the news, that STILL don’t justify cold-blooded murder, but white people are using them as an excuse to why his killing doesn’t deserve justice or outrage.  It’s the most common argument I’ve seen people use.

misandry-mermaid:

fabulazerstokill:

sassy-gay-justice:

I’m terrible.

I would get bingo so fast if I brought Ferguson up on my FB feed

They left off the one that I’ve been seeing the most, which is the ridiculous justifications for why he was targeted: smoking pot, robbing a store, trying to grab the officer’s gun, etc. All these things that were made up or speculated about on the news, that STILL don’t justify cold-blooded murder, but white people are using them as an excuse to why his killing doesn’t deserve justice or outrage. It’s the most common argument I’ve seen people use.

"

Look, I’m glad ‘12 Years [A Slave]’ got made and it’s wonderful that people are seeing it and there is another view of what happened in America. But I’m not real sure why Steve McQueen wanted to tackle that particular sort of thing.

[‘Fruitvale Station’] explains things like the shooting of Trayvon Martin, the problems with stop and search, and is just more poignant. America is much more willing to acknowledge what happened in the past: ‘We freed the slaves! It’s all good!’ But to say: ‘We are still unnecessarily killing black men’ – let’s have a conversation about that.

"

Samuel L. Jackson (via artyartyhadaparty)

I think in light of 12 Years a Slave winning the Oscar for Best Picture, this needs to be remembered. Because it is a very important point in terms of the palatability of 12 Years a Slave and why Fruitvale Station didn’t even get nominated when it has such acclaim outside of the Oscar world.

(via artyartyhadaparty)

(Source: seashoresunmapped, via demarches)

kudipeaches:

#grande_dre
@zellieimani
#HandsUp
#MikeBrown
#BlackLivesMatter
#RipMikeBrown
#StopLyingOnFerguson
#IfTheyGunnedMeDown


- PEACHES

(via justjasper)

browneyesandthickthighs:

prettyboyshyflizzy:

candidinatlanta:

"As the protesters marched through the streets, it began to storm. Every time the thunder crashed, the protesters would cheer louder and louder. It seemed as if mother nature herself were cheering them on.."

We ain’t going away this time

Did they even MENTION this ON CNN?

(via missvulpix212)

"

Popular performers both reflect and shape social attitudes.

The white rapper Eminem won a Grammy Award while I was writing this book. At the time of his award, one of his newest popular songs was “Kim,” the name of Eminem’s wife. The song begins with the singer putting his baby daughter to bed and then preparing to murder his wife for being with another man. He tells his wife, “If you move I’ll beat the shit out of you,” and informs her that he has already murdered their four-year-old son. He then tells his wife he is going to drive away with her in the car, leaving the baby at home alone, and then will bring her home dead in the trunk. Kim’s voice (as performed by Eminem) is audible off and on throughout the song, screaming with terror. At times she pleads with him not to hurt her. He describes to her how he is going to make it look as if she is the one who killed their son and that he killed her in self-defense, so that he’ll get away with it. Kim screams for help, then is audibly choked to death, as Eminem screams, “Bleed, bitch, bleed! Bleed!” The murder is followed by the sound of a body being dragged across dry leaves, thrown into the trunk of a car, and closed in.

Even more horrible than Eminem’s decision to record this song glorifying the murder of a woman and child is the fact that it did not stop him from receiving a Grammy. What is a teen boy or a young man to conclude about our culture from this award? I believe I can safely say that a singer who openly promoted the killing of Jews, or blacks, or people in wheelchairs would be considered ineligible for a Grammy. But not so, unfortunately, for encouraging the brutal and premeditated murder of one’s wife and child, complete with a plan for how to escape consequences for it.

And, unfortunately, Eminem has plenty of company. The extremely popular Guns ’n’ Roses recorded a song that goes: “I used to love her / But I had to kill her / I had to put her six feet under / And I can still hear her complain.” The singer (Axl Rose) goes on to sing that he knew he would miss her so he buried her in the backyard. This song supports a common attitude among physical abusers that women’s complaints are what provoke men to violence. Another outstanding example is the comedian Andrew Dice Clay, whose repertoire of “jokes” about the beating and sexual assault of females has filled performance halls across the country. Fans of these kinds of performers have been known to state defensively, “Come on, it’s just humor.” But humor is actually one of the powerful ways a culture passes on its values. If a man is already inclined toward abuse because of his earlier training or experience, he can find validation in such erformances and distance himself even further from empathy for his partners. In one abuse case that I was involved in, the man used to play the above Guns ’n’ Roses song on the stereo repeatedly and tell his wife that this was what was going to happen to her, laughing about it. But in the context of verbal assault and physical fear that he created, what was a joke to him was a blood-curdling threat to his partner.

"

— Why does he do that - Lundy Bancroft (via scherbensalat)

(via fuckyeahsexeducation)

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